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Joined 1 year ago
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Cake day: June 14th, 2023

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  • shirro@aussie.zonetoLinux@lemmy.mlHow bad is Microsoft?
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    1 month ago

    I don’t think about Microsoft at all mostly. I supported their stuff professionally in the past and friends/family but otherwise total avoidance. They own some big game studios so I probably use some of their products like Minecraft but I haven’t used their operating systems or applications for decades and I dislike and distrust cloud services and theirs is no exception. All big companies tend to be the same. Try not to depend on any of them.





  • shirro@aussie.zonetoLinux@lemmy.mlUsing ChatGPT with Linux
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    3 months ago

    I apologise for the language but I am fed up with this shit.

    I don’t think promoting OpenAI/Microsoft services is very compatible with the open source/free software ethos.

    OpenAI pretend to be a non-profit but are controlled by billionaires and Microsoft. I am not going to take up a subscription and have my personal data mined by a company so I can have the arch wiki and man pages developed with millions of hours of volunteer labour served back to me.

    I used to attend Linux/free software conferences decades ago and there would always be that one person who thought Facebook or Google were brilliant and that adding everyone’s lives and personal data to gmail or facebook was totally fine because the APIs were cool and big companies are totally ethical, “Don’t be Evil” etc. I thought they were foolish then and I think time has shown they are even more foolish now.

    Every news site and forum I go to, even very non-technical ones, has people appear out of nowhere exclaiming with enthusiasm how OpenAI/copilot solved all their problems in great detail. Whether they are genuine or are just on the hype train created by bots and paid influencers I am at my breaking point with this shit. It is worse than the crypto bros with their NFT monkeys and get rich schemes. It has nothing directly todo with Linux or open source software. I escaped reddit to avoid all the influencers and people peddling shit but it is here as well and people can’t see it for what it is.




  • Does it use safe development practices though? Or is mainstream Rust development npm leftpad all over again with developers dumpster diving for dependencies to make their lives easier and more productive.

    There is potentially a price to pay for colour ansi graphics and emoji and it comes in the form of a large tree of often trivial third party crates of unknown quality which could potentially contain harmful code. Is it all audited? Do I want it on a company server with customer data or even on a desktop with my own data?

    The various gnu and bsd core utils are maintained by their projects and are self contained without external dependencies and have history. There are projects rewriting unix core utils in Rust (uutils) that seem to be less frivolous which are more to my taste. Most traditional unix utils have very limited functionality and have been extensively analyzed over many years by both people and tools which offsets a lot of the deficiencies of the implementation language.


  • Disney announced the end of physical media in Australia and New Zealand. Blackmarkets arise naturally when supply does not meet demand. It is preferable, morally and for society if people share media for free rather than fund organised crime as happens with most other black markets. I try and support creative industries where I can but piracy is the lesser evil in some cases.


  • Most of us do live in bubbles (not exclusive to lemmy or tech nerds). I first picked up Ubuntu in 2004. It was a massive leap forward at the time as Gnome was moving a lot faster than Debian stable and I was running Sid to keep up. I am genuinely surprised everytime I learn Ubuntu is still “popular” as they have made so many NIH misteps over the years (mir,upstart,unity,snap) and frustrated their users. I moved back to Debian years ago for server/dev as Ubuntu re-packaging wasn’t adding any value and once I was on another distro for desktop I lost all interest.

    Ubuntu started off with some amazing community building. It felt more like a peoples distro than Canonicals for a time. I felt more invested in it in those days so I can relate to Ubuntu users but I also understand some of the criticism aimed at Canonical and their choices.


  • Anti-viruses are a scam and always have been. They aren’t much more than security theater and box ticking. Don’t get into the mindset that you can outsourse security to a single product. Security is something that happens in depth. The more intrusive av software can itself become an attack vector as it often runs with lots of privileges.

    Distros operate with webs of trust and cryptographically signed packages. Your distro installer verifies the integrity of the package. There is no need to check a third party signature database. It adds no value. Even well audited software could contain hidden vulnerabilities so increasingly we are running software with less capabilities via systemd, flatpak/brwrap or in containers. The environment is very different to the origins of av software on Window 9x where people would download random unsigned executables to a system with no privilege restrictions.

    There are lots of challenge for the FOSS community. We love features and freedoms and those features and freedoms sometimes make security more complicated. We need to show more restraint packaging software like ssh and not add so many patches and additional dependencies. We also need to show more restraint in the typical rust, go or javascript project where adding dependencies is so easy we end up sometimes including hundreds of them for stupid crap like coloured messages or being able to handle a dozen config file formats. I don’t care about your garbage collection or advanced compile time checks, if you include hundreds of crates from other developers you are no better than npm and I would put more faith in a 20 year old c library.


  • I was setting up a modded minecraft launcher for the family to use and and I have trust issues with the modding ecosystem and kids installing random jar files. I used bwrap and it works really well. The launcher uses wayland, minecraft typically X, needs dri access for opengl, pipewire, input devices, networking and dns resolve to connect to servers etc. Doesn’t need filesystem access to much other than some shared libs (ro) and a directory in .config. There is a bit of trial and error involved and making the bwrap robust to differences between desktops (different sockets for dns or mdns resolvers) and makes me appreciate apps packaged as flatpak as this level of sandboxing should be standardised for all distributed apps. Half the stuff in AUR should be bwrapped IMO.


  • shirro@aussie.zonetoLinux@lemmy.mlWhich terminal emulator do you use?
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    6 months ago

    There are a small number of terminal emulators I would be happy to use as daily drivers and most of them have been named here but my default is kitty. It supports everything I need and a lot I don’t and doesn’t have any showstoppers. All the modern terminal implementations are performant enough. I used real terminals like vt-100s and vt-220s. Everything we have today is awesome by comparison. We fetishize performance and features too much. Once you have something that works there isn’t much reason to change IMO.


  • shirro@aussie.zonetoLinux@lemmy.mlI had a journey
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    10 months ago

    I don’t really see the link to communism though I can see the parallels to social democracy.

    Private ownership of computer code should lead us to a hellscape where all code is owned by a handful of huge companies and wealthy elites. But instead of doing away with private ownership and making all code public domain we added regulation in the form of free and open source licensing that democratized private ownership and made it serve our community. Perhaps that is the real lesson, not communism.


  • shirro@aussie.zonetoLinux@lemmy.ml*Permanently Deleted*
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    11 months ago

    Exactly. It depends on the user and their requirements. Windows has far more commercial software support and is pre-installed and supported on a huge number of systems. Linux has many advantages in a large number of niches and if you operate in those niches it is hard to understand why anyone would choose to use Windows but a lot of people don’t choose their OS at all. It is chosen for them when they buy their computer or dictated by their job or the software they need.


  • I am out of touch with piracy. I was never a media hoarder but I can’t stand ads and the quality of local tv has always been shocking. I used to have a media centre with a tuner and timeshift/ad skip in the mid-2000s but was increasingly getting my tv shows from ezrv. Then I had a login with a cool nzb site but they shut down. I was accessing Netflix over my own vpn long before it was offered outside north america. Streaming was awesome for awhile and I have been happily subscribing to multiple services for years. As the number of services increased and the cost got higher I started putting them in rotation much to the annoyance of the rest of the family. Not looking forward to piracy to be honest. Going to have to relearn where best to find stuff. It was nice having content just there for the family whenever they wanted it and not having to do anything but make some payments.


  • shirro@aussie.zonetoLinux@lemmy.mlAntivirus recomendations
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    11 months ago

    The typical consumer Windows antivirus was designed to solve a different set of problems in a different environment and analysing files for signatures and behaviors against known threats was very valuable when so many people were running executables from unsafe sources intentionally or not. Even on Windows an antivirus has never been the best way to secure a machine. It was always the lowest common denominator solution that you put on everyone’s machine because it was better than nothing.

    Linux has been well served for a long time by the division or privileges between root and users and signed trusted distro sources. The linux desktop is trending towards containerized flatpak applications running in seperate namespaces with additonal protection via seccomp. Try and understand the protections Linux provides and how to best take advantage of them first and only reach for an antivirus if you still think it is needed.


  • Windows has improved a lot. I was committed to using Linux before windows 95 and that era was a complete shit show. They couldn’t even connect to the internet, play cds or other media without third party software and Windows crashed if you looked at it the wrong way. People thought it was the hottest shit ever. Even after the move to the NT kernel it was a shitshow of instability and massive security flaws for years. I think I could daily drive modern windows if there was no alternative. They have come a long way with stability and a lot of FOSS software is ported.

    Windows still benefits a lot from network effects which makes it desirable for some people for the same reason they use Xcrement and Meta. It doesn’t bother me what OS other people use anymore than what they do in their bedrooms or churches. Let’s not act vegan over an operating system.


  • I fully manage our machines as they are a resource shared by the whole family and used for work, study and play. We do have old machines, electronics, home server, arduino etc available for tinkering if they are interested and there is a lot that can be done in user space if they were interested so I don’t know that they are missing out.

    It is possible to do arch updates from a gui but arch occasionally requires manual interventions. These are normally documented through arch announce and easily searchable if an update breaks some functionality but intervention usually requires the console and I am fine with that. In my experience debian and variants do offer a simpler update experience since you are usually only applying security updates within your current release. If they were on a stable Debian based distro I would probably setup unattended automatic security updates. Arch is more like a refined Debian Sid.